Thursday, September 27, 2012

Ryberg, T., & Ponti, M. (2005). Constructing Place: The Relationship Between Place-Making and Sociability in Networked Environments. Dirckinck-Holmfeld, L., Svendsen, B., & et al (Eds.), In: Theoretical framework on selected core issues on conditions for productive learning in networked learning environments. Aalborg University/Kaleidoscope. (Kaleidoscope Deliverable; No. 24.3.1.).

Tuesday, September 25, 2012

The Best Tools for Visualization

Websites as graphs

"Everyday, we look at dozens of websites. The structure of these websites is defined in HTML, the lingua franca for publishing information on the web. Your browser's job is to render the HTML according to the specs (most of the time, at least). You can look at the code behind any website by selecting the "View source" tab somewhere in your browser's menu.

HTML consists of so-called tags, like the A tag for links, IMG tag for images and so on. Since tags are nested in other tags, they are arranged in a hierarchical manner, and that hierarchy can be represented as a graph. I've written a little app that visualizes such a graph, and here are some screenshots of websites that I often look at.

I've used some color to indicate the most used tags in the following way:

blue: for links (the A tag)
red: for tables (TABLE, TR and TD tags)
green: for the DIV tag
violet: for images (the IMG tag)
yellow: for forms (FORM, INPUT, TEXTAREA, SELECT and OPTION tags)
orange: for linebreaks and blockquotes (BR, P, and BLOCKQUOTE tags)
black: the HTML tag, the root node
gray: all other tags"
The SCImago Journal & Country Rank
Networks, Crowds, and Markets: Reasoning About a Highly Connected World, By David Easley and Jon Kleinberg

Saturday, September 1, 2012

Computer Attitude of Teaching Faculty: Implications for Technology-Based Performance in Higher Education

Computer Attitude of Teaching Faculty:
Implications for Technology-Based Performance
in Higher Education

Josephine A. Larbi-Apau and James L. Moseley
Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA

Pure Data

Pure Data
Pd (aka Pure Data) is a real-time graphical programming environment for audio, video, and graphical processing. It is the third major branch of the family of patcher programming languages known as Max (Max/FTS, ISPW Max, Max/MSP, jMax, etc.) originally developed by Miller Puckette and company at IRCAM. The core of Pd is written and maintained by Miller Puckette and includes the work of many developers, making the whole package very much a community effort.

Pd is free software and can be downloaded either as an OS-specific package, source package, or directly from CVS. Pd was written to be multi-platform and therefore is quite portable; versions exist for Win32, IRIX, GNU/Linux, BSD, and MacOS X running on anything from a PocketPC to an old Mac to a brand new PC. Pd can run on smarphones thanks to projects like libpd and RjDj. It is possible to write externals and patches that work with Max/MSP and Pd using flext and cyclone.

Pd was created to explore ideas of how to further refine the Max paradigm with the core ideas of allowing data to be treated in a more open-ended way and opening it up to applications outside of audio and MIDI, such as graphics and video.

It is easy to extend Pd by writing object classes ("externals") or patches ("abstractions"). The work of many developers is already available as part of the standard Pd packages and the Pd developer community is increasingly growing. Recent developments include a system of abstractions for building performance environments; a library of objects for physical modeling; and a library of objects for generating and processing video in realtime.

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